Author Topic: Origin: Paranaque  (Read 781 times)

Rockford

Origin: Paranaque
« on: December 19, 2007, 09:37:19 pm »
Origin: Paranaque


The name "Parañaque" is derived from the phrase "para na aque," which was commonly used in the past when people wished to disembark from kalesas (horse-drawn carriages). The phrase literally means "stop now, boy": "para" from the Spanish parar (to stop), "na" from the Tagalog word for "now" or "already," and "aque" from the Tagalog word for boy, lalaki. An alternative meaning of "para na aque" could be "stop here," with "aque" being derived from the Spanish aquí ("here").


From Palanyag to Parañaque

Palanyag, the old name for the city of Parañaque, generally means "my beloved", among other definitions, for as far as its residents are concerned, this best describes their affection for their hometown. Another version came from the combination of the terms "palayan" and "palalayag", the former meaning ricefields of which the city once abounded in and the latter pertaining to the sailing and fishing occupation of many of its residents. This was also a sign of cooperation and goodwill between the two major working sectors of the town, the farmers and the fishermen. It was however a drunken guest, during a certain affair which decided on the final name, who said "Mabuhay ang Palanyag at ang mga taga-Palanyag! (Long live Palanyag and the people of Palanyag!)" So the name stuck from that day on. Another version, according to tradition, was when a Spanish soldier told the driver of his caruaje or horse-drawn carriage, to "Para aqui, para aqui (Stop here, stop here)!" The driver, uncomprehending, kept on prodding his horse to go on while the soldier angrily repeated his instruction: "Para aqui, para aqui!" Onlookers just laughed as the Spaniards empathically said "para aniya aqui para aniya aqui (he said 'stop here' he said 'stop here)." For days the incident was repeated around and term "para aniya aqui" stuck. There is another story that says of an imposing balete tree at the mouth of the Parañaque. It looked like a boat sailing slowly and majestically, earning the Tagalog term Palanyag, a corruption of the term "palayag" which means "point of navigation". Further adulteration of the word later resulted in the word "palanyaque". A historian believes the town's name may have come from the term "palanas" which means a "broad flat plain," the geographic description of Parañaque.

Other origins of the name Parañaque are "palanac" (with no special meaning), "patanyag" or contest for popularity, and "paranac", a native term for the shell product that used to be the livelihood of the natives of the town at one time. Parañaque, in the olden times, was where many people unboard the "kalesa", or horse-drawn carriage and would usually tell the conductor to "para na aque", which literally means "stop now, boy". The word "para", taken from the Spanish word "parar" which means to stop, "na" is a term in the Filipino language which means "now", and "aque" taken from the Filipino term "lalaki" or "lalake", meaning "boy". The phrase "para na aque" was used so often that it eventually evolved into a term pertaining to a place, thus, Parañaque. An alternative meaning of "para na aque" is "stop here", where the term "'aque'" might have also come from the Spanish word "aqui" which means "here". Whatever the correct origin of the name of Parañaque, the various terms strongly suggest the town's storied and mosaic past.

Source:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Para%C3%B1aque


kicakepucake

Re: Origin: Paranaque
« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2007, 11:35:58 pm »



thanx for the info